Monday, August 12, 2013

Thousand Word Pictures

Before she left on Saturday afternoon, Caroline tried on my new skirt and like the jacket, it looked fabulous on her.  She went away with two realizations - that styles she'd never considered before could actually be flattering and that starting with too large a size and including far too much ease was making her rather gorgeous figure look dumpy instead of feminine. This is good.

On the other hand, it was not nearly so good for me to see how flattering the skirt was on her because face to face with the mirror, I had thought it looked fattening and after seeing it on slimmer hips, I was pretty sure it was fattening on my wider ones and then - after seeing the pictures - my conclusion was DEFINITELY fattening. As the saying goes, a picture is worth a thousand words.




It's not the skirt. It's the skirt on me or the way I feel in the skirt or that illusive combo of the two. You might find it lovely. The pattern is Sandra Betzina's Vogue 1333 sewn in an unknown fibre which appears to be a linen/rayon blend. To wash out the chalk lines, I threw it back in the washer and it shrunk some more. It was a shock but a happy one since it actually looked better smaller... but not better enough... I'm going to take it apart and make something else from the fabric. It's too yummy to waste.

Seeing those pictures, I wondered how other skirts that I think look great on me actually look in pictures. The skirt above looks better in the picture than the mirror. The skirt below looks better in the mirror than in the pictures. Picture talk can be slewed and it's still a most helpful tool.

Taking all these images was a real stretch for me. I'm not this comfortable in front of the camera but I wanted to know so I set up the tripod, wore the same t-shirt and shoes in each picture, and stood in roughly the same location. It's informative.




This is the linen skirt that I refashioned from a jumper that Diane had refashioned. I'd worn it all day before this pictures was taken and not only does linen stretch with wear, I've lost a few pounds. It looks big on me. As well, dark on the top and light on the bottom is definitely not my best combo. I love the skirt and it would be far more flattering in a darker color. What I see in this picture is the importance of bringing the details away from the hip line and of pegging the bottom more to give me shape like...




... Marcy's Vogue 8499 skirt. I have two versions of this skirt and wear them frequently. Next time, I might go down a size and shorten the skirt slightly however, I think this bell shape is much more flattering than the previous two. What do you think?




The next three skirts are slightly too tight. I could just barely get them on. A couple more pounds and they'll fit much better. This straight skirt is one of my favourite styles. With the narrower bottom, I think - and tell me if I'm wrong - that it shows off the curve of my hip and creates a long, lean line. Again, after seeing this image, I think it could be slightly shorter. Normally, I wear it with higher heels. The pattern is McCall's 3830, a basic pencil skirt.




This is my most favourite style - trumpet - sewn from a stretch denim. It is, as I said earlier, a bit too tight but even so, I think it's quite flattering. The pattern is Burda 8213 which I've sewn numerous times in everything from knits to casual woven fabrics to silk dupioni to lace.  Quite a few of the patterns in my stash are variations on this theme.




I don't normally wear short skirts without tights or pantyhose as my legs are not my best feature which means I wear longer skirts in summer and shorter ones in winter and that works. That said, I wasn't putting on tights so you're getting the bare leg version. This is my favourite short skirt style hemmed just above the knee which is - I think - a flattering length. Again, let me know. It's McCall's 5523. The back...




... is very fun - view D with two lower back flounces. The fabric is a stretch woven which is why it's doing such a good job of following my curves. I haven't worn the Sandra skirt in public however, I get frequent compliments when I wear any of these other skirts.





I am short waisted. Recently, I've started to think more specifically about how that impacts garment and style choices and choices like a dress versus a skirt with a top. The topic came up because of an interesting observation. The skirt above was sewn from Sham's tutorial which was based on a dress her friend had seen in a store that was similar - if not identical - to Vogue 1312. The skirt....




... looks incredibly fattening while the dress gets numerous compliments and feels fabulous on. Above is the muslin. The actual dress was sewn from a knit with less ease, a V neckline, and 3/4 sleeves but I don't have a picture of me wearing it.




Realizing that fuller skirt details seem to look better on my figure when attached to a bodice makes me wonder if the pleated overlay on the Sandra skirt would look better if it was one element of a dress and not a separate skirt or if it was over a slimmer skirt. As a dress, it would have similarities to Vogue 1297 which is on my sew list only it needs a knit fabric and I don't have a suitable cotton or linen knit in stash. It would be similar to the RTW dress below.




I've also been doing a lot of thinking about curvy figures and fussier styles with fussy meaning things like the pleats in the Vogue 1333 skirt. Of course, there are degrees of fussy. I'm experimenting with possibilities. Many styles I think are attractive are not so attractive on me and - just as before  - what I see is that my preferences come back to less fussy and more clean lines, simple shapes, texture, and streamlined details as well as softer fabrics with drape.

Perhaps I should stop experimenting - since wadder after wadder can be demoralizing BUT... probably not. Experimenting seems to be part of my sewing DNA and I like to try what tickles and see what happens. You never know.

Right now, I'm working on a McCall's 6286 blouse from a light-weight denim. It's proving a challenge as I don't normally work with raglan sleeves and this design has an unusual center front panel and doesn't contain useful information like the center back length. I have had to think through my usual adjustments in new ways and I'm not sure that the choices I made while prepping the pattern are correct... but I'm having fun anyway... and we'll see when I'm done.

Talk soon - Myrna

Grateful - I really appreciate the private emails, encouragement, contact info, and book recommendations I've received for dealing with my allergies and chemical sensitivities. I've learned some valuable information that is, I hope, the answer. It won't be easy or quick but improved health is definitely worth working toward and I'm highly motivated.

Update - when our house guest moved in, we discussed our non-negotiable rules and that there would be no second chances and unfortunately, he is no longer living with us. We're all quite upset over his choices but not questioning the consequences. It's a tough learning curve for my soft hearted son and an eye opener into his own life on some levels. 

44 comments:

  1. Beautiful stuff.... I love the silhouette of the green "pencil" skirt on you.... you lose 10 pounds by having the clothing slimmer on your body.... The other stuff looks nice too but that one is a stunner! Blessings!

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    1. Thanks so much. It is definitely one of my favourite pieces. The skirt is made from a fabric made from two light-weight layers that I machine stitched together in an orange thread with a looping pattern. The bottom layer forms the lining and is pink with white polka dots. I've had the skirt for years and hang on to it because it always makes me feel wonderful... when it fits... VBG.

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  2. Interesting about the camera vs. the mirror. I think that to some degree our brains see what they want to see in the mirror, versus what is real. Whereas the camera gives us what is real.

    The camera has really helped me with balance, which I didn't realize was 'off'. I've discovered that I look horrible in flat shoes with skirts. Heels, preferably 2", do wonders for me. Open toes look better than closed.

    I discovered that tops at my favorite length were terrible for me. I look MUCH better in tops that end at the top of my hip bone.

    It does look like your skirt length needs to be shorter on the longer skirts. Or if you want that skirt length, you need to shorten the top and lengthen your visible leg by wearing higher heels.

    Another thought...can you tell I love thinking about this stuff???...everything's too round. If you added either a v-neck top with jewelry filling in the v, or added jewelry in a V shape.

    I was thinking about a chunky bracelet also. Something interesting visually. It would help to keep the eye up higher. Right now the eye is drawn to hip level, not your pretty face. :-)

    That trumpet skirt is definitely your best look, isn't it. Interesting thought about how the detailed skirt as a skirt isn't your best look, but if it's part of a dress it's good. I wonder if that's because there's no color contrast between the top and bottom then.

    Maybe what you need is one overall color. I really like that light gray skirt ...what if you wore it with a light gray top? Perhaps a short top, with something longer over it if you're not comfortable with such a short top?

    That gray skirt is so fun....we gotta figure out a way to make that work for you!

    So sorry about your houseguest. Always hard when you extend a hand and try to make a difference in someone's life, and it doesn't work out. Sending good thoughts his way, that he gets things figured out.

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    1. I'd agree that the camera is probably more real but I also think it's important to be a good photographer. I'm getting better but...

      I wasn't trying to style these images with the correct length of top or neckline or jewelry or any of that stuff. I'd put on my casual clothes for lazing around when I decided to take the pictures. That crew neck rarely makes a public appearance without a scarf over the neck-line. My primary goal was to see how the skirts looked on my hips. If I'd been getting dressed to go out, I'd have made other choices.

      LOL - I absolutely LOVE to think about this stuff too so I'm definitely interested in your opinion.

      Less contrast and closer to one color is always better on me. It has a nicer flow. With the grey skirt, I think a factor that makes it feel more fattening is the elastic waist. There's no shaping, just gathering. A more flattering line is a technique I learned with the Marcy skirt shown to taper the waist and add both elastic and a zipper. With that method, there's a lot less fabric around the middle and for those of us with a bigger difference between hip and waist size, it works wonderfully.

      Thanks for sending Avery good wishes. I do hope he gets things figured out. Tough age, wanting to be but not quite an adult and dealing with consequences.

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    2. I hadn't thought about elastic AND a zipper. Much better idea!

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    3. It works fabulous because you can bring the top of the skirt in much closer to the body and eliminate a lot of the excess fabric but still have the fit of the elastic waist and the in/out ability with the zipper. If you don't have that skirt pattern, it's worth getting just to see how she does that. I also tend to cut my elastic narrower - 1/2-3/4" - as there's not much room between my ribcage and my hips. If the elastic rides up on my ribs it tends to roll.

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  3. Hi Myrna: You are such a style/fashion researcher....your quest for knowledge is unquenchable, isn't it? Anyway, here's my thought about the skirt....I wonder if it's a question of proportion rather than the skirt not being flattering. I looked at the other less conventionally designed skirts and thought they looked pretty cool and flattering, so maybe it's where the drape is placed or that the drape itself blends too much with the skirt, so it seems to add more bulk to the skirt and they eye doesn't see it so much as a design detail? I will have to go and see if there are photos and reviews of the SB draped skirt on Patternreview.com and see how fabric choice affects the look of the skirt. I'll be interested to see what others think and where this takes you.

    all the best,
    Helen

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    1. LOL - I do like to know.

      Proportion is definitely a part of the answer. The skirt looks much better with a top tucked in as opposed to wearing it over the skirt however, tucked in on me looks stubby because I'm short waisted plus - with the gathers - I look very thick through the middle. That's what led to the questions of what if it was a dress or what if the overlay was over a more fitted skirt. Both would be fun to explore. I did read the reviews. Mostly I wanted to see what happened. IMHO, it absolutely needs a really soft fabric with drape.

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  4. IMO McCall's 3830 is a *perfect* pencil skirt pattern. It really is amazing on everyone who makes it. I love the long version you made here, it accentuates your figure REALLY well. Beautiful!

    I am gaga over M5523. I love it!

    Nice work on all the lovely skirts.

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    1. I agree. I think everyone should have M3830 in their stash. It's such a useful pattern. M5523 is VERY fun to wear. It feels feminine and pretty on and I really like it sewn in a stretch woven that moves well with the body.

      Thanks for the compliments.

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  5. Taking wardrobe photos like these is time-consuming, irritating and absolutely invaluable. I often feel, upon finishing a project, that I won't know how much I do or don't like the garment until I've photographed it on me and posted it to the blog. Kudos to you for undertaking such a helpful exercise with these skirts!

    The McCall's 5523 looks quite nice on you--it's interesting to see you in that silhouette. I think the trumpet skirt is lovely, but it is getting a boost from being the same color as your top, which leads to your dress observation. I find dresses soooo much easier to wear than separates on my also-short-waisted figure. It's a bit of a sewing bummer, because I do like sewing skirts. So many bits of fabric lend themselves to skirts, and it's much easier to whip up a skirt than to fit a bodice and construct a whole dress. But I've finally learned that skirts the skirts in my closet get far less wear than the dresses (particularly the skirts with volume). Both the dresses you show look great on you!

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    1. Photos are invaluable. I also find wearing it a time or two gives me a better understanding of the style on me as does trying to put together the look.

      Before I returned to fashion sewing, I predominately wore skirts because I couldn't find a dress that fit my figure. I got so used to skirts that it's taking a shift in mindset to realize how flattering (and easy) dresses are. We'll have to find other ways to work those fabric scraps into dresses - VBG.

      I'm intrigued to sew the V1297 dress. I think it'll be fun to wear and has a good chance of flattering me after trying on the similar RTW one.

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  6. I think the best look is the M5523. The longer skirts just seem to overwhelm you with fabric. I agree that some of it has to do with the contrast of the the top and bottom color - the long lines of the dress all in one color are very flattering, especially the green one. It seems to me that all the details you love so much should be on the top, rather than the bottom, to help balance your figure. And show your legs! You say they're not your best feature, but you appear to be taller and slimmer when I can see them. :-)

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    1. Interesting. I do wear the longer skirts with higher heels which helps with the overwhelming idea however - that said - I do think they are a bit too long now that I see these images.

      I think the M5523 skirt is very flattering on me too and I love wearing it... which is a LOT in fall and winter with tights. It's not the shape of my legs that is the problem. It's that I have a lot of varicose veins and I'm uncomfortable with them showing. The tights solve that problem and since I love tights and pantyhose, works for me. In the colder months, I wear far more shorter skirts than long ones.

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  7. Ripple Dandelion: "Taking wardrobe photos like these is time-consuming, irritating and absolutely invaluable." heehee! v. true. My prescription is to find a spot that's easy to set up. i use my ironing board as a tripod, in addition to the little gorillapod on the camera, i secure my camera strap to the board with two pins. The ironing board is 5 feet from where i need it to be to take pictures, so practically no set up involved. I also take at least 10 shots of each outfit, you really need to rack up the #'s in order to get familiar with the camera and with modeling. I also say take videos if you can, they can capture a lot of things that the still camera won't.

    re: posing. rule #1 - whatever is closest to the camera looks biggest. You look like your camera height is somewhere near your hips? you might experiment with moving it higher up, this will downplay the hips and upplay (?) your shldrs/bust. It's also closer to how most adults see you in real life (unless you're playing to toddlers ;)

    You have a short waist and loooooong legs. The long place on anyone is where you get to play with all type of details, which will look fussy and crowded if you place them on short spots of the body. Which is why you look great in dresses with little/no details thru the torso and all the action down at the hem. You are long from knee to foot.

    And everybody looks slimmer in a column of one tone/color. Everybody looks slimmer in closer-fitting clothing (as long as you avoid the 'sausage effect'). But do you want to dress like that all the time? I feel safe in answering for you: 'Bo-Ring!'

    heehee, so i would say experiment with columns of same tone/color, clean vertical lines thru the torso, and let the fun begin from mid-thi to knee on down. Plus what Mel said: "...everything's too round. If you added either a v-neck top with jewelry filling in the v, or added jewelry in a V shape." A think a vee neckline would be quite flattering. I know the attraction of the classic crew neckline, but i really need a vee to break up the bust and these linebacker shoulders!!

    I think there's people who want to wear what they want and pfooey to 'how it looks'. But if you want to pull off your creative vision whilst also looking fabulous, it pays to be more strategic. And i just love it when i've sweated over learning just how to dress this non-standard figure, come up with a look that knocks 'em dead, and i get: "oh you, you can just wear Anything!!!"

    yeah. right. ;) knock 'em dead Myrna!!!! and that trumpet skirt is just divine.......steph

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    1. Doing this one paragraph by paragraph...

      ... I'm getting better at photos. I have a tripod, a spot on the floor, and the camera is level. I'll try raising it slightly higher and see what happens. I would REALLY love a remote rather than running back and forth to the self timer.

      My long place is also my wide place. I think that creates some interesting proportions and dilemmas and is why a dress works much better. I'm seeing that the detail does either need to be at the hem or need to be in the seaming like with that dress of Marcy's I sewed recently - V8876.

      I don't think I'm long from knee to foot. Need to measure it again but I remember it being two heads before. It's waist to knee where I think I'm longer.

      A column of sameness is good to know for family photos and dress-up events. It might be boring as an always look but there is also the challenge of making it work - how to un-bore boring. See my reply to Mel. I wasn't trying to style these looks or they'd have been much different. The crew neck never leaves the house without accessories to detract.

      I know some people look at me (us) like I'm (we're) crazy when for spending so much time and energy on these concepts but they're my passion and intrigue me and it's so fun to find like minded people who want to share that journey. It's info like this that helps me to help other women to look and feel fabulous, more confident, capable, able to face the day and overcome adversity. It's a lot of pressure on some clothes but with the right clothes, there's less pressure in the rest of life. I think that's why I liked Bobbie Thomas' book - The Power of Style - so much. It makes that connection.

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    2. Steph, I really appreciate your photo suggestions, taking better pictures is something I struggle with. Having a tripod (found at a yard sale) has helped me, but I didn't think about how what level the camera is at would affect the pictures.

      I think I really need to go back and figure out/look up how to measure my various proportions again, since I recall that I actually am slightly longer from the knees down (in proportion to my head), as opposed to the fact that I am astonishingly short waisted. I suspect that is why I hate wearing separates, and often put a line of embellishment at the hem of my dresses (don't look at my waist please... but look, relatively shapely tidy legs...)

      Myrna - I don't think it is crazy or self indulgent to spend time thinking and working all this out; I find it fascinating and have for many years. It is, as you mention, a way to look and feel our best, which helps us to be as well and functional as possible, and allows us the most expansiveness to do what we are here on earth to do. (hope that doesn't sound too woo woo, I am in the middle of an ongoing conversation with friends about " what is your life purpose?" I know that I get further with my own personal growth, and can do more to help make the world a better place in my own small way, when I feel like my appearance is a help and not a hindrance.

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    3. Thanks for not thinking I'm crazy or self indulgent. Thanks for understanding. It doesn't sound woo woo to me... but then... I've spent a lot of time on that other question - what's my purpose. It's completely confounding to me that at the moment it's to rest, to sew, to share, and to support and encourage. That seems to simple, too easy, too fun and I think that's one of the problems with trying to answer that question. For me, I made it too big as opposed to being grateful for the ability and choosing to do well at what I'm good at and passionate about and then sharing it with those who want to know.

      I don't think there's anything we do in life that can't benefit from feeling good about ourselves which includes our appearance.

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  8. "It's the skirt on me." It's that the skirt has the great bulk (pun intended) of it's interest at exactly the spot you want to appear slimmer, the point you want to de-emphasize. It's a skirt best worn by the slim-hipped and linebacker shouldered. IMO. steph

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    1. LOL - which is a closer description of Caroline and why it looked so fabulous on her. I just knew you'd have an opinion Steph. I was waiting for it.

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  9. Seeing all these photos one after the other makes me realize, once again, the truth of how slimming and flattering a long, unbroken column of color is to any figure. I love the trumpet skirt on you and the one with the pleats in the back. The bell shaped skirt has possibilities. Tops in the same shade, or close to it, would be even more flattering, imho.
    I love the pleated detail on the back of the pencil skirt. I think small touches like that give a piece of clothing personality and a bit of added flair without taking over the body wearing it.

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    1. Monochromatic or near value seems to work well on me. I'll take slimming and flattering. LOVE the trumpet skirt. It really is one of my favourite styles and I definitely should look at details like those flounces more often. The darker Marcy skirt with the black t-shirt seemed to do okay. I think shorter.

      I agree - small touches do have personality. Some people can carry off more drama. I'm not one of them.

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  10. Well, what a task you took on taking all those photos. I agree with the other commenters, one color from neck to hem is most flattering... if not all one color, then try for a close value. I have the opposite proportions to you (length-wise, that is) in that I'm long-waisted,and shorter legged. ...and also wide-hipped. I have a pattern I made from a J.Peterman dress I bought a very long time ago. Any shape neckline I so desire, sleeveless, fitted to the bottom of the armholes and then flaring into an a-line. I wear it just above my ankles and have made it several times in rayon challis. Since I don't bare my upper arms in public any more, I wear them with various jackets and tops or somewhat fitted cardigans. I find flat sandals work best with the longer length or boots. I'm inspired to do some "stuff" to the skirt on one of these... taking my inspiration from some of the examples you've shown us today.

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    1. It was a task. So glad that I didn't try to "do" each outfit. That would have taken forever.

      Although it is boring - as Steph said - I can see how similar value, monochromatic or close color schemes are the most flattering. I'll play with that more.

      Your dress pattern sounds fabulous. Is there a link?

      LOVE to see what you come up with for skirt stuff.

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  11. I love the Vogue 8499 (Marcy skirt). I totally get what you mean about slimming and flattering going together. But sometimes I wear something that is not slimming, and yet I feel it's very flattering. Also, often photos can look meh, while the real garment on the real person looks lovely.

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    1. I absolutely love that beige refashioned skirt and I enjoy it every time I wear it. I will - going forward - think about pairing it with a top of similar value (which will be near to impossible to find in my wardrobe and could possibly need to be sewn) and with higher heels and a statement necklace. I may even take it in. I love it that much... even if it is not the most slimming.

      The camera is highly informative and occasionally lies.

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    2. K. Line said: "But sometimes I wear something that is not slimming, and yet I feel it's very flattering. Also, often photos can look meh, while the real garment on the real person looks lovely." I so agree!! Really, i wish people would be able to believe what you've just said. Their lives would be so much easier and happier!

      Myrna, i have to say that the camera 'lies' plenty. For example. You measured, in person, your body and found that you're not that much longer from knee to ground. However, looking at all these pictures to me you look very long in that area......which makes me suspect you've been placing your camera pretty close to the ground. Whatever is closest to the camera will look bigger, or dominant, in the picture frame. Thus the long knee to ground impression. So in this case the camera is providing confusing information....

      ....because a lot of advertising dollars have been spent convincing all of us that "the camera captures nothing but the absolute truth!" (harumph). Anyways, in my experience it seems that the most 'realistic' photos come out when the camera height is between the hips and shoulders. Even so, this will be an approximation. I choose to place my camera nearer hip height to play down the bust/shoulders, IMO people should just choose what they think looks good as far as pics go, but that's heresy in some style blogging circles :)

      And i misspoke - i didn't mean to say monochromatic is boring, good grief that is how i dress 90% of the time! I meant to say that dressing with the sole intent of looking 'slim' or 'youthful' or whatever the grand poobahs think is 'flattering' these days, with no attention to personality, interests, unique physical quirks, etc. is boring. Sorry!

      there's just been a discussion on Stitcher's Guild forum on the autumn 6PAC thread about how to make 'columns' that aren't matchy-matchy boring. I took a bunch of pics of these type of columns from me closet, i need to download/edit/post; once you see a few it's a lot easier to put them together. heehee, Myrna i'm sure glad you like to hash this out as well, take care!! steph

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    3. Can you tell I'm easily distracted today. Slow progress - but some - on the McCall's top.

      The digital camera has become one of the most useful tools in my studio, especially for fitting myself, and even so... definitely... and frequently... it lies. I agree it's the angle at which you take the picture but it also shows wrinkles are more prominent than they are and lines as less flattering. Perhaps it's a component of light although I sometimes wonder if my lack of confidence in front of a camera is a factor that prevents "personality" from being a (flattering) part of the picture.

      Hip to shoulder level - I'll try that. My waist to knee is 23" and my waist to floor is 41" so knee to floor is 18". What is missing above the waist was moved below. Sigh... I don't think that makes my hips any narrower no matter what. And that's okay. My hips and I have become friends.

      OH... YES... I don't worry about youthful except for looking too youthful as in little girl. I don't like that feeling. And I find that I don't need to worry too much about slim either because I'm predominately drawn to slimming lines and colors. When I have a garment that isn't as slimming, there is usually a high fun factor to compensate. I think personality, interest, character, individuality, personal style, uniqueness - all those words - are the most flattering elements of dressing and the most fun to attempt to bring into our clothing with the added challenge that they appear to be a moving target.

      Are you going to post those pictures on your blog? I'd love to see them and read your reflections. LOL - I doubt I'll hash it all the way out. More likely I'll keep re-inventing the wheel and adding new kernels of "truth" now and then.

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    4. heehee! i'm getting things done, but slowly.....just experiment with different heights to see what you like. AS i said, i place my camera on the end of the ironing board which makes getting the height i want super easy. And i measured - i only stand at most six feet from the camera so it's not that awful without a remote. And by now i've taken thousands of self pictures, so by now it's practically automatic!

      ooof, i am just going thru a busy spell. I'm seeing a new doc and increasing a new nerve pain drug whilst decreasing my previous drug....thank heavens the new one is really addressing the problem (which is a big one - pain and weakness to the extend it's been years since i could even take a frikkin' bath) but it does take attention and causes a lot of 'ruckus' where my ability to do stuff goes up, down, around.....definitely on the uphill path but plenty of curlicues on the way.

      On top of that - the weather here has just changed. 12 years of baking all summer - late may thru mid to late october - a cool day would be in the low 70sF, and the nites never got cool.

      Last two summers have been COLD. We had one hot streak in june, other than that it's like a san francisco summer with foggy morning, sunny afternoon and cool nites. I'd planned to make V8691, in voiles and lawns, but rite now i need warmer things. I have managed to change my direction, but it's all kinda crazy.

      all of which is to say - i hope i see those pictures on my blog too, but it may be a while....... ;) take care, stpeh

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    5. LOL - and I hope I see them too.

      It takes so much energy to figure out health issues. HUGS. I hope it works out.

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  12. Wow, you went to a lot of work to take all these pics! But I can tell that you found it very helpful, so time well spent....

    I too prefer the long line of color on myself. And I too am very short-waisted. My husband and I are the same height--5'7"--and there's about a 3-inch differential in our leg length. (I have no waist, essentially.)

    At any rate, the shorter trumpet skirts are extremely flattering on you and are my #1 pick. #2 would be a tie between the long column and Marcy's bell shape. You might want to experiment with length, just to see where your "sweet spot" is with both. And as other commenters have noted, shoe choices make a difference, too.

    Sorry to hear about the young fellow.

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    1. I'm glad you found the pictures helpful. Me too! My legs are longer than my husband's as well. When we're hiking, I never walk behind him because I'll walk over him. Thanks for the vote. I'm going to do some pinning and photographing to play with length ideas. May need to see if I can buy a remote first.

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  13. hmmm, couldn't reply to your reply! The Peterman knockoff is just one pattern piece which I traced directly off the original. I will make a sketch with notes and scan it and send it to you.

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    1. Weird. I have that problem when I'm using my laptop at my daughter's or Starbucks or somewhere else. Otherwise, it works great at home.

      Thanks for scanning the image for me.

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  14. oh, fiddle, my mind is everywhere today, the most important thing is:

    I LOVE these type of posts, where a person just puts on a bunch of different types of garments without a lot of styling and posing....it is so helpful to be able to see what effect the various colors, textures, details, and shapes have on the body. As sempstresses sewing garments, this information is so vital and it's much harder to get hold of than it should be. Of course the vendors want to sell their products, so they make them look great, and how many style/sewing bloggers want to put out a bunch of pictures they're less than thrilled with?

    i love the eye candy as much as anyone (eating and making!), but if that's all we 'eat' we never learn. Frankly, i think you look pretty great in most of these looks, a couple mite want a tweak or two, but in the end you've come up with a nice variety of flattering silhouettes! Hooray! steph

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    1. I'm all about honesty. With the exception of that first (just sewn) skirt, I've worn all of these successfully. Some are better than others. Oh well. Life's like that.

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  15. Think about pegging the hems of your pencil skirts to keep from looking boxy. I have to make this change to all of my pencil skirts. I add a godet or vent to give me walking ease. You look slimmer when the skirts are closer fitting around your hips. Te Diane skirt looks like there is too much fabric around your hips. The trumpet skirt looks great. It is one of my favorite skirt styles. I never thought about making it longer than knee-length.

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    1. Thanks. I'll definitely keep those tips in mind. I agree that less fabric is more flattering.

      How much do you peg a skirt? These are both smaller at the hem so I'm assuming you're suggesting even narrower. Just wondering how you decide that.

      I love the trumpet skirt in both short and long. It's very flattering.

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  16. I am so sorry to hear that after your generous offer of your home, your guest could not manage them. He sounds so troubled. I guess you are not collecting gift cards for him anymore? What a shame for him.. for the sake of a few rules.

    All of your skirts are lovely but I think the straighter-lined ones make you look so thin! I love the trumpet one too. None look bad on you, but I feel the straighter ones are more flattering. You were your clothes well. I feel like a dumpling even though I have lost well over 20 lbs in the last few months. The only thing that works for me is a program called The Zone, developed by Dr. Barry Sears, basically each meal and snack being a 40/30/30 combination of good carb, good protein and good fat. A little confusing at first but once it sets in, it is easy and nothing is really taboo, so long as it is not too often, and that bad carbs are balanced with the appropriate amt. of protein. The protein slows down the absorption of the carbs so they do not get dumped into the body as sugar. Good luck, but I think the clothes look nice now.

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    1. We are all still quite devastated by our guest's choices. He had such an opportunity and made a bad choice. I'm guessing he didn't think we actually meant no second chances.

      A few years ago, I read about the Zone diet. The conclusion I've come to lately is that what all good eating habits and diet plans have in common is no processed foods, a focus on whole foods, an higher ratio of fruits and vegetables to protein, eating moderate amounts, exercise, and paying attention to your body. What I've read recently about how the digestive tube works has led me to really see why that's important plus why supplements would be beneficial. We know about carb/protein combos because our son is a type 1 diabetic. With all that information, I know I can make wise choices without confining rules. I hope. I'm aiming in that direction.

      Thank you for the compliments on the skirts. I agree that straighter does look more flattering and I'm glad they all look good on me. We do need variety. With your weight loss, you may find you need to explore new styles and options and think about if you're wearing too much ease. Congrats.

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  17. I love the idea of taking self photos (mind you I am good at liking 'the idea' of many things). Thank you for sharing them with us.

    "Taking wardrobe photos like these is time-consuming, irritating and absolutely invaluable." That sounds like a pretty good description.

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    1. You're welcome. They are informative and I'm glad they helped not just me.

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  18. I love the 'bell' shape and the short skirt, the dress at the end is really flattering 😃
    Nikie

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    1. THANK YOU - I really appreciate the feedback. I definitely want to make more dresses and that one at the end is tickling.

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Thanks for commenting. I appreciate the feedback and the creative conversation.