Tuesday, September 17, 2013

Lack Or Plenty

Do you live life from a perspective of lack or a perspective of plenty? Are you a glass half full or a glass half empty kind of person? It's a conversation I've been having with a number of people over the past few weeks - how do they approach life and how's that working for them?




Even though we were more than comfortable, not lacking in any of the essentials, and had plenty of extras, I grew up in a home that focused on lack. So did my husband. The terminology our parents used, and the general feeling we came away with was one of not enough and that's the attitude we both carried forward into our adult lives. I don't believe a focus on lack is limited to money even though it certainly starts there. It's insidious. If you allow it, it can get into every corner of life.




One of my goals is to learn (continue to learn) to think and talk and move through life with the perspective of plenty. It's why I always include something at the bottom of each posting that I'm grateful for and I'm amazed at how hard that can be some days - which is a whole statement in itself - that I would struggle to find one thing to be grateful for - which surely means I'm overlooking the obvious because I am alive and typing at the time and that's amazing.

I've been working on this goal for almost ten years now and I have to say it's quite difficult... because of that voice in our head... you know... the one who says yeah but... or sure... or get real... or any of those other self sabotaging phrases that make us feel less than who we really are.




We all have voices from our past that haunt our present. They meld together shaping themselves into the inner critic who seems to attack just when everything is going wonderfully positive. The inner critic is a common conversation in art - the voice of doubt and uncertainty and criticism.

Strangely enough - or perhaps not - it's in the area of creativity that I've most strongly conquered that perspective of lack. The pieces I produce are not as creative as I know I can be and I find that awareness encouraging rather than demoralizing. When I meet someone who is far more creative than I am, it's an honest thrill because I know I can learn from them and that I can move from this place where I am now to a new place that is even more creative. I'm on a path. I'm moving in that direction. I am...




... in the process of being amazingly creative. It's such a strong belief that the universe supports it, which sounds all misty swirly mysterious and yet, to me, is simply about clarity and belief. God can't do much to help an indecisive person who keeps hopping on and off the fence. Pick a path and things change. 




My ability to see plenty in the area of creativity and to talk with plentiful language in that space gives me hope for the areas where I'm struggling. And I pay close attention to the people I know who live from a perspective of plenty, listening to their terminology, watching their actions, looking at their character and their choices. Don't you think it's amazing how we can learn from others?



The Fabricland near my daughter's house was having a FABULOUS sale this weekend. Over half the store was marked down 70% and the bargain center was marked down an additional 50%. As you can see, I saw plenty of potential.

The first picture is (top to bottom) a satin-like polyester in lime, cream, and black, a light-weight cotton with dobby dots and embroidery along each selvage as shown in the detail, and a heavier, cotton print. The third picture is a layered black and pink mesh knit, a black, purple and cream t-shirt knit, and a fuchsia wool polyester blend coating. The fourth picture is a flocked knit, a light-weight striped crushed polyester skirt-ish fabric, a denim knit, and striped denim with 2% spandex.

The amber, metallic embroidered, crushed batik is so not in my color range but I loved it and bought 1 1/2 meters for something... probably a little girl's dress. I bought one meter of the knit mesh and between three and five meters of the others and the total bill was just over $100.00. THAT's the perspective of plenty that I'm working to have in all areas of my life... especially with relationships...

... because I believe that life is all about relationships and that it's the people in our lives who are the most important ingredient. We had a good visit with our daughter and son-in-law this weekend and plenty of snuggle time with our (absolutely adorable and yes I'm biased) grandson. It was good.

Talk soon - Myrna

Grateful - growing the perspective of plenty

12 comments:

  1. Hi Myrna, I really appreciate this post coming from the same thought background as you do--and I especially like your thought about God and our indecisiveness. Thanks

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    1. You're welcome. Life is such an interesting journey. One thing I didn't note in the posting - and that I've noticed - is that people who operate from a perspective of plenty have a sense of humour. They laugh more and approach life more joyfully.

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  2. Geez, I wish I lived near you! My immediate thought upon reading that God couldn't do much for those that keep hopping on and off the fence is that He is where the PUSH comes from to get back up there!

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    1. LOL - I of course immediately wondered where you do live only that info is not included in your profile.

      I'm pondering your thought, that God is the PUSH to get us back up there. I'm grateful for the way my faith has helped me weather many difficult situations and I would definitely agree that he is the push to keep us going. The older I am physically and the more mature I am in my faith, the more I've come to believe that God's plan for my life is entirely about living in relationship with him and not about the minute little details and that we humans make those details far more important than they need to be and cause ourselves untold stress by doing so. I used to think that my life was an entirely mapped out plan - Myrna will do this, and then this, and then this, and so on - and I've come to see that that's not free will at all and that within the framework of living in relationship with God there are a myriad of choices that are mine to make - a perspective of plenty being one of them. Did I explain that right? I hope it made sense.

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    2. Well, I'm in south Georgia in the US, so I might as well be on the moon! And yes, your explanation makes perfect sense--we just have to be open to that little nudge from above that helps us direct our free will. It has taken me many, many years to be still enough to pay attention and recognize that little nudge when it happens.

      I'm having some serious fabric envy, absolutely drooling over your new stash!

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    3. Georgia is a bit far. Darn. That would have been fun. I've gotten much better at nudge listening as I've gotten older as well. Good thing.

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  3. You got some lovely fabrics. I notice that some of them are synthetic. I know you were having health issues with synthetic fibers a while back. Are you OK now?

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    1. Thank you for asking.

      While it's not always the case, I typically find better buys on synthetic versus natural fibers so... considering the sales and my budget... the majority of my stash is a synthetic blend of some kind. I've started buying better quality fabrics and 100% natural fabrics or synthetic/natural blends like the polyester/wool coating whenever I can. Sales help with that. Otherwise, I'm being very careful to stagger the natural and the synthetic projects so that I'm not working with synthetics back to back. That said...

      ... I am following some different protocols in regards to eating and helping the body to heal itself based on the books that were recommended and I think my sensitivities are improving - enough that I'm hopeful at some point they'll be completely recovered although I think I'll always have to be careful.

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  4. Yes, perpective is everything, isn't it? For many years I detested housecleaning, even though I need a relatively clean house to function! Then I learned the phrase "house blessing" (from FlyLady, I think). While cleaning house is still not my first activity of choice, now I am able to move through it, picking up and cleaning, focusing on gratitude and the act of "blessing" my home as it blesses me and my family. What a difference this change in perspective has made!

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    1. I just finished reading The Five Love Languages by Gary Chapman and it talks about the impact of a change of perspective on relationships. I wonder how amazing we could all be if we truly grasped the power of our minds.

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  5. Both of my parents grew up during the Great Depression of the 19302-40s. I did not. Still, I find my inner self holding back from buying something I want -- or need. Why am I saving little scraps of food and fabric that will never be of use to anyone, for anything? A ball of string, knotted together in short lengths, rolled tightly and then shoved into the back of a closet shelf? Why did I do that? Why do I have such a huge mass of elastic circles cut from the waists of underpants -- I'll never use them, not even in the garden to tie up tomatoes. We all have more of our parents/guardians/caregivers lurking in us than we might care to imagine.
    Hunger and want are such powerful forces that they can negatively influence even the thought patterns of generations to come. I grieve for the little boy and girl who had to save their shoes to wear for school, and go bare-footed the rest of the time; whose families were too poor even for an outhouse. They made sure that their children lived with a sense of abundance, not want. Still, the stories of the hard times were so frightening to their children that each one of us now has to fight the impulse to stint ourselves. Well, most of the time, anyway.
    Your thoughtful post has inspired me to go ahead and shop for that pair of pale pink shoes I so longed for in 1984. If anyone still makes pink shoes. In my size. Etc, etc.

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    1. We are definitely a compilation of all we've been exposed to. I know I'm highly influenced by my parent's approach to life with that perspective of lack which came from their parent's approach to life which was influenced by some really hard times. Like you - I need to find my version of pale pink shoes. And if you can't find pale pink, remember you can dye white ones. Enjoy ! ! ! ! ! !

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Thanks for commenting. I appreciate the feedback and the creative conversation.