Wednesday, September 4, 2013

This Time Fuchsia

When I started this little jacket, I had some specific buttons in mind - the ones I'd used on the Marcy dress back in July - only they'd already been discontinued. The same shape was available in a different shade of pink but different wasn't even in the same range.




These are - IMHO - rather ugly glitzy from the front and a lovely, smooth, fuchsia on the back. I used them upside down and that ended up being a better choice than the original ones. They go fabulously with the stitching on the coat.




Like yesterday's coat, I serged the seams to the front and then zigzagged over them with decorative thread, this time fuchsia. There are a LOT more seams. Please... please... please... take a minute to appreciate the band in the picture above. I re-did it three times and I'm amazed that the front withstood that degree of stitching and unpicking since the printed knit was the least stable. It's all safe and secure now. And even.




When there were vertical seams between horizontal seams, I twisted the ends in opposite directions so the seam would stand out and be more visible.




The three rows of ruffles were made by serging each edge of a 1" wide strip and then zigzagging with fuchsia and then gathering down the middle and then stitching in place with a narrow zigzag over the gathering stitch. It took quite a bit of time and was - I think - totally worth the effort.




As I mentioned yesterday, I ended up replacing the original bodice. It was made of the plain black used in the skirt. There wasn't enough left for a second bodice so I used a ribbed knit and stabilized it by underlining with cotton scraps. To remove and replace the bodice, I cut it off at the seam and then serged it back on losing 1/4" in length. Oh well.




Because the design has a raglan sleeve, when I redid the bodice I also had to redo the top of the sleeve. I cut 1" above the seam into the black and then serged the new upper portion in place ending up with black against black - and that's okay - it worked fine.




The print is left over from a skirt and the black and the grey were left over from t-shirts. The piece is Kat Wise inspired. She does the most amazing coats used upcycled sweaters. This is a fun video showing her technique. If you watch it, you'll see that my piece is only inspired by and doesn't follow along identically especially...




... the collar - the part that got me in trouble. Originally, I wanted a little red riding hood kind of hood and tried to copy one from another pattern only it ended up more like a hoodie hood so I cut that off and tried another version and it didn't work either so I cut that off and tried a band with a collar and that really didn't work and by that time the neckline was quite low and very stretched out so I redid the bodice. This final collar is made from serged scraps of the scraps with a grey under-collar. I was down to little bits and have almost no fabric left at the end of this project which is perfect for zero waste sewing. 




To start, I measured the original hemline of the pattern including the godets and then drafted wedges that merged from that width to the waist width and then decided how each section would be broken up. The skirt is VERY full as you can see...




... in this image. It's a really twirly - twirly skirt and - LOL - I'm sure you knew this would happen - I did fix the collar. I told myself that if I could find the first black stitch tucked into the black ribbing and remove it safely then I'd redo the collar and if I was shooting in the black and not sure if I was about to rip a stitch or the fabric, I'd leave it. I found the stitch. I fixed the collar. I feel much better about it. YEAH.

Talk soon - Myrna

Grateful - inspiring artists - Thanks Kat ! ! !

34 comments:

  1. These little coats are beautiful, and so carefully made! I wish my daughters were young enough to wear them. You know, these would really sell in a high end children's boutique! Myrna, I really enjoy your blog and look forward to each day's comments and I admire your sewing and design expertise.
    Heather in Calgary

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    1. Thanks Heather. I didn't make them to sell but then the inevitable what are you going to do with them question comes up so it's certainly something to consider. Right now, I'm enjoying the creative push. I'm glad you appreciate the blog. Thank you.

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  2. You may have found your "calling"! People will pay for things for their kids that they would not purchase for themselves! Fun creative outlet WITH a purchasing market..... hmmmm. that translate into sucess! :) Linda

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    1. LOL - my calling. Too fun. I agree that there could be a market but I'd need to do some research into connecting the dots to find it. It's certainly not where I live.

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  3. Myrna, I just love all your little coats. The details you added are amazing, and I am sure the little girls who get these will love them!....Anna

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    1. Thanks. They're definitely the kind of coat a little girl loves. When my daughter was younger, she had something similar and adored it.

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  4. I was thinking that same as Linda.....perhaps you've found your niche!!!

    Wonderful coats!! You've outdone yourself!!

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    1. It's really an interesting exercise to fill in the same framework with such different variations. Tomorrow's is more dress than coat and that puts a whole new spin on it. If I finish it that is. I'm almost done - LOL.

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  5. When I was little I would have loved a coat like that, and cried when I grew out of it.

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    1. It's possible I might enjoy one all grown up - LOL. I love clothing that makes me feel flirty and feminine.

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  6. So - are you selling these? Because they are unique and wonderful!

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    1. I wasn't planning to but it's certainly something to consider. Thanks for the lovely compliment.

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  7. This comment may sound like an echo, but I agree. Your styling of these little coats is so unique, so special I suspect there is a market out there. Something that you would do without quota's etc. Even so, some lucky little girls out there will be very enchanted with their twirly coats.

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    1. I believe there is a market. I'm not sure how I'd connect with it and before I do any work I would want to think about how to structure such a business. Definitely, the fact that each piece is one-of-a-kind and not mass produced is a huge plus from my perspective.

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  8. Hear, hear!! I agree with everyone else:)

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  9. These coats are amazing. Also inspirational.

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    1. YEAH - I'm glad they're inspirational.

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  10. I love, love, love your little coats. I'm sorry for whatever unhappiness drove you to wallow in this project, but it has sure motivated you to produce some stunning beauty!

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    1. LOL - so the secret to artistic success is being miserable. Hmm... I think I've heard that before but it doesn't seem sustainable. I'll have to try artistic and happy.

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  11. I am really finding your little twirly coats to be a great inspiration - talk about making lemonade from lemons... The way that you add color accents by zigzag stitching over the serged edges is something I've not seen before and is a wonderful additional "tool in the toolbox" when designing. I imagine that you do a lot of sample stitching to come up with just the right look for your projects. P.S. I thought I was the only one that ended up turning buttons over to use the reverse side...

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    1. When I was writing quilt books, I had to learn to work in colors that were not my own so that the examples and illustrations would cover a range of tastes. It was a good exercise. I think recycling other people's clothing could create an similar adventure.

      The zigzag edges came from the question how can I... get the color where I want it when the serger won't do the trick?

      Happy to know I'm not alone turning over buttons... or fabric. I love how it doubles the investment.

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  12. Wow - not sure which one I like better - both gorgeous. What lucky little girls.

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    1. Thanks. There are no specific lucky little girls although I imagine some one at some point in the future will end up with them. Since I blog five days a week, I decided to make five for this week just to see what could happen. It's good learning. I know what I'd do different and what I'd do more of next time.

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  13. These are all wonderful. I particularly love the lime stitching and the pieced collar.

    Glad you're back on track.

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    1. Thanks. I love the variations on a theme.

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  14. oh my gosh, this one is to die for!

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    1. LOL - please don't. Stay and enjoy.

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  15. The coats are gorgeous, especially today's. Really interesting to see how effective the coloured zig-zag over the serging can be.

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    1. And not difficult to do. The thread is Mettler Silk Finish which is a bit heavier and has a sheen. Works wonderfully.

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Thanks for commenting. I appreciate the feedback and the creative conversation.