Monday, March 31, 2014

That's A Huge Purse

Although I tend to carry very simple, very plain purses - typically black - they are one of my favourite ways to play with design, refashioning, and remnants. In this case...





... I'm using remnants of the remnants from the four men's shirts. First I sewed the skirt and then the little girl's dress and now I'm working on Marcy Tilton's Vogue 8783 bag. Of course, I'm not sewing it exactly like the pattern. That would be - LOL - just wrong - or at least not quite me.





The red and the black purses shown in the image above are the same size and the purple-orange one is smaller. The larger ones are 18" wide by 13" high and the smaller one is 13" wide by 9" high by 7" deep. I'm not sure how deep the larger one is but...





... this picture convinced me to measure other bags I own to see how big that actually was and decide that I'd rather sew the smaller size. That's a HUGE purse, more like an overnight bag. I like the shape and the somewhat oriental feel of the triangle but not the rectangles. They're labeled as pockets but unless I'm reading the instructions wrong, they're more patches than pockets because they don't actually do anything which is fine because...





... I wanted to show off my fabric. I started by cutting a piece of backing and thin batting slightly larger than the pattern piece and then layered bits of the shirts using three of the four prints.





Next, I zigzagged the edges using an medium stitch to secure the pieces to the batting and prevent fraying. And then...





... stipple quilted. It neat enough but it's not anywhere near the kind of work I used to do which tells me  I haven't been doing a lot of quilting lately - and perhaps I should practice to keep up my skills - but then again - maybe not. That's not the direction I'm working toward right now and even though my lines are not very exciting, it's okay in this case because they form the background.





On top - I seem to have fallen in love with serger strings. These ones are all black and secured in place with turquoise stitching. It creates the look of stained glass. I think I have the correct shade of turquoise to the correct shade of dusty pink - complimentary colors - because it's hard to get a picture that isn't slightly out of focus due to the energy between the two colors, energy that gives a muted color scheme vibrancy.





This image compares the base fabric with the black serger strings at left and without them at right. LOVE the way the strings bring everything together and give it life. More tomorrow.

Talk soon - Myrna

Grateful - another way to utilize the scraps making THE Most Expensive Dress Ever not quite so expensive

13 comments:

  1. Myrna, I love what you are doing with these "remnants". Looking forward to seeing the finished product!....Anna

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    1. I'm bringing some purses and little girl coat/dresses with me so remind me at coffee to show you. They'll probably be in my car or room then because the workshop doesn't start until the next day. And... of course... I'll want to see some of your bags too.

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  2. It looks very beautiful! I can't wait to see it when its done.

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  3. Love the finished look the strings provide - can't wait to see the finished product!

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    1. It's so fun when you find a new trick. All the years that I've been serging and now I find a new use for those "seams". Love when that happens.

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  4. Nice stitching, IMO! And have you seen this bag: http://www.afashionablestitch.com/2014/inspiring_me/something-splendid - very fun for spring.

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    1. That bag is gorgeous. Thanks for the link. The technique is bargello. It's pieced in strips and then cross cut, staggered, and sewn back together. All the stitching is straight seams and the technique is actually quite quick with fabulous results. I have a few pieces of bargello left from my quilting days - not in silk dupioni but still something to consider making into a bag.

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    2. I think you could do something fantastic with the pieces you've retained!

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  5. This is so much fun! The serger strings are the icing on the cake. Beautiful.

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    1. I'd originally been thinking of narrow bias strips with the edges pressed under and then of raw edge, narrow, bias cut pieces and then - since it was so fresh - why not use the serger strings again popped into my head and it's so easy although it's rather hilarious to be deliberately sewing and trimming serger seams. I want to experiment with making them along a bias strip that would curve and flow better. That could be fun too.

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  6. Please!! How did you make the server strings?? I love the look!

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    1. Just serge two pieces of fabric together and then cut off the stitched part and do it again. You'll end up with strings that are covered in thread.

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Thanks for commenting. I appreciate the feedback and the creative conversation.