Monday, April 14, 2014

Tremendously Better Than Ready-To-Wear

Early Wednesday morning, my oldest son and I are driving to Calgary to visit my daughter and her family and when we get back Howard and my youngest son will be home from their trip to Guatemala which means that tomorrow is my last day of sleeping in and moving slow before life returns to our regular routine.





This morning, I sewed the button on the Burda 8157 pants and took some mirror pictures. The pants turned out pretty good. There's a little tweaking I want to explore but that will always be the case since I love the challenge of figuring things out.





In Pants For Real People, author Pati Palmer notes that pants sewn from a stretch fabric will always have front wrinkles although I think these are - in part - LOL - due to the fact that I ate breakfast right before taking these pictures.





One of the reasons I like trouser style pants is the way the side seams hang. On me, the side seam of tighter pants will start downward and then move backward for my high hip, forward for my thighs, somewhat straight for my flat derriere, and then backward for my protruding calves. It's a wobbly line. In the past, I haven't paid much attention to my thighs but when I made the muslin for these, I realized that I needed to factor them in more.

I sewed the muslin from a woven fabric a size smaller and then decided the pants were too tight especially through the thigh so I went up a size and probably shouldn't have for this particular fabric with it's stretch factor. I ended up taking the side seam in all the way down to the hem which may have thrown the leg slightly off balance. If you look at the grading on a pant pattern, it is wider at the waist and hips and narrows toward the hem. These pants are not unwearable though. In fact, I really like them until...





... I look at this view. I was surprised to see those wrinkles below the butt. I need to do some further research but they may be caused by too long of a back crotch extension. I tried...





... taking a one inch tapered tuck out of the back crotch length and that did help but not enough to be the complete answer.





The Burda crotch curve definitely follows my shape with the shorter front crotch extension, longer back one, and downward drop so it's in the right general direction and simply needs fine tuning. I'm going to pin a tuck into the pants to shorten the back crotch extension and see how it changes those wrinkles. Unfortunately, I cut out my next pair of pants last night before I took these pictures and that's okay. I can baste them together first depending on what I learn from the pinning and tucking and... as I said... these ones are not unwearable. In fact, they're tremendously better than ready-to-wear. YES YES ! ! !

Talk soon - Myrna

Grateful - a clean house, two days in the studio

11 comments:

  1. Myrna, I bet if you have time to watch a couple of Peggy Sagers' webcasts on fitting pants, you'll find a simple way to get rid of the excess fabric right below your "rear end" as she puts it! Even with that bit of excess, those are a gorgeous pair of pants!

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    1. LOL - I've watched a lot of Peggy's videos. She's very talented. I'll talk about the solution that works for me in tomorrow's posting.

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  2. This is why I started following your blog in the first place....your figure is very very similar to mine. If it looks good on you, it looks good on me. And vice versa. :-)
    And I was dying to see what you'd some up with for fitting adjustments to trouser patterns!

    These pants are still salvageable...take in the back crotch seam...right above where the curve ends on the way up. Directly in a horizontal line with the center of your butt cheek. Don't extend into the curve. The problem is where the balance point is, where the fabric starts to hang from your butt cheek. Right there in the back seam there is too much fabric. Then make the curve more like a square than a curve.

    I *think* the horizontal seam coming back from the center seam needs to extend just a wee bit further, and then make a pretty sharp turn (rather than a curve) upwards.

    On the pattern you could take a vertical tuck in the back crotch extension to shorten it?

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    1. And so naturally I wanted to see your blog and what you're sewing only it doesn't look like you have one ? ? ?

      These are definitely fixable. I pinned out a fix that has worked for me before and I'll talk about it tomorrow. Sounds like we're on a similar page.

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  3. Great pants, even if not quite "best". You'll get there.

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    1. I pinned out a solution. If I'd taken the pictures earlier, I'd have done it before the posting. It's quite simple. When I get back from Calgary, I'll fix them because I really like how they fit and I know I'll wear them a lot. I need to pick out some edge stitching to free up the crotch seam. It's not a big deal - just not what I wanted to do today.

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  4. Yes, yes, pants we sew are always so much better than RTW even if there are tweaks to make next time. These look so good.

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  5. i remember reading somewhere that european patterns are cut with a different crotch than us patterns ,as you noticed here.Just wanted to let you know its not just you lol.

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    1. And not just the crotch. Burda pants have a great reputation. They get good reviews. Burda patterns seem to fit me really well with less alterations than the US ones. I use Vogue the most and Burda second most.

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  6. Love the fit of these Myrna, even though you are still tweaking it. I'll be waiting for your next post.

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Thanks for commenting. I appreciate the feedback and the creative conversation.