Wednesday, July 9, 2014

Thirty-Six

On Friday, when my friend and I went to the gallery in Kelowna, we talked about the book Overdressed: The Shockingly High Cost of Cheap Fashion. Near the beginning, the author counts and lists her wardrobe. My friend is less inclined to move clothing along than I am, especially clothing that she has sewn herself. When she inventoried her closet, she had fifty-two t-shirts. When I inventoried mine, I had forty-eight garments in total. I have...





... a few more now but not more than another half dozen. After visiting the gallery, we stopped at one of my favourite boutiques where I often buy jewelry. My friend wondered if I had as many necklaces as she had t-shirts. No. I have thirty-six. Although I sort through them on a regular basis and get rid of what no longer appeals to me, it's far more rare for me to part with jewelry than with clothing. This year, smaller, finer jewelry is more popular and I prefer statement necklaces so I haven't bought too many new pieces. The one above was bought with the birthday money my youngest son and his girlfriend gave me and the one below was ...





... bought with the birthday money my oldest son gave me. Up close, it looks like plastic lifesavers tied together. It's very light. When I showed it to him, he said he would NEVER have bought me that. Well... LOL... yes you did. I found both pieces in Ashland, Oregon while at the retreat.





At the boutique in Kelowna, I picked up this necklace that is a combination of gold and silver loops and chains interspersed with silver balls. It's more sedate but has great wearing potential - as all of them do - because a bunch of black t-shirts and thirty-six necklaces equals a lot of different looks. It works for me.





This is my best inset so far although - being completely honest - I really can't see myself doing these much. They're quite fiddly and I'd prefer to applique a piece on top rather than inset one even though the look is radically different. BUT... this is a technique worth learning. Next, I'm going to try bound buttonholes. Those and welt pockets are more likely to get used however... first...





... I have to finish painting the doors in my son's room. By the end of breakfast yesterday, he had decided to quit his job, move back home, and explore new directions. Immediately. As in he's moving back tomorrow. When we renovated in January, we changed the access to the downstairs washroom which filled in one wall in his room and added another closet. Both sets of closet doors and the entrance door were primed but not painted. The closet doors will be turquoise - a nice splash of color and he loves color - and the entrance door will be white. I also need to paint the trim but I may only get it done around the doors and not the floor. Tomorrow is too soon.

Talk soon - Myrna

Grateful - half a can of paint - enough

When one door closes, another opens, but we often look so long and so regretfully upon the closed door that we do not see the one which has opened for us. 
- Alexander Graham Bell

10 comments:

  1. I am more likely to "move along" pieces that I have made, than rtw I have purchased. The reason is that I know I can always make another something for myself, but I may never be able again to find and buy that perfect whatever in a store. All that said, most of my rtw is from a thrift store. It is either better made than I can do myself, or from better fabrics than I can access, and/or I have made extensive alterations to improve the fit. I do try to pin in a piece of muslin with the size and fabric content written with a Sharpie, on the me-made pieces I donate to charity.

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    1. How interesting. A lot of people are more committed to their sewn pieces but I totally get your point. I love thrift stores - for ideas, for fabric, for notions, for refashioning. YES YES.

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  2. "Turn of fabric" is one of the challenges in getting smooth insets. To side-step the turn of fabric issue, prepare the base fabric by stay-stitching the shape and size desired. Snip away the base fabric where the inset will go, leaving a seam allowance. Clip as necessary, turn and press the seam allowance to the wrong side of the base fabric, keeping straight lines straight and corners at the desired angles. Lay the prepared "hole" over the inset fabric. Lifting up the base fabric, smoothly pin and baste it to the inset, keeping straight lines straight and corners as planned. Check for accuracy, then (from the wrong side of the base fabric) stitch just outside the stay stitching to join the two fabrics together. Press carefully.

    Either the base fabric or the inset fabric needs to be prepared first, then stitched to join with its complement. I don't think it would be possible to prepare both the base fabric and the inset before stitching them together because that would not account for turn of fabric.

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    1. THANK YOU Carol. Great information.

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  3. Love all three necklaces you chose. I love what a big, chunky necklace can do for an outfit. Add a big necklace to a black tee and pants or skirt, and you're put together. Nice purchases!

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    1. Thanks. I wear them a lot but it was good to count the necklaces and pull some out that need to get back into rotation. I'm with you - black t-shirt, great necklaces, good look.

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  4. Get your son to help with the painting.

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    1. Yes. I agree... except he's never painted before and was working nights so it wasn't prime time for training. Next time though.

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  5. Love the necklaces. A fabulous way to "glamify" a casual outfit.

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Thanks for commenting. I appreciate the feedback and the creative conversation.