Tuesday, March 24, 2015

Organic Creativity

Buttons and buttonholes are not something for me to do at 5:30 in the morning when my eyes are emerging from blurry mode. Since that's all that was left to do on the blouse I'm making, yesterday morning I worked on a tank top. It's the sleeveless version of Marcy's Vogue 9057 - a great pattern.

I love when creativity happens organically, when one thing connects to another and you end up engaged in a project that's far more fun than you'd anticipated. That often happens when I make a mistake or when I don't have enough fabric as with this pink and black rib. There might have been enough for a regular tank top but not for one with an asymmetric hemline and individually cut pieces.





I cut out a full back and a partial front and mimicked the angle of the hemline across the bodice and then I pieced strips of fabric to form the bodice alternating the direction of the ribbed pattern row to row.





Marcy once referred to this technique as my signature element. It's something I brought into fashion from textile art. I layer the fabrics and stitch them together with until I create a big enough piece to cut out the desired shape. I love the texture this technique creates.





Once I'd pieced a full front, I stabilized the hemline, neckline, and armholes and how I'm ready to finish sewing the top together. I have the side seams, the hemline, and binding the neck and armholes. So far, I plan to use pink binding but we'll see what really happens.

Talk soon - Myrna

Grateful - play

If necessity is the mother of invention, then play is the father. Use it to fertilize your thinking. The next time you have a problem, play with it. If you don't have a problem, take time to play anyway. You may find some new ideas. Try adding a constraint or two to your problems as a way of stimulating your thinking. 

18 comments:

  1. I love this technique. Did you serge finish all the seams on pieced section?

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    1. No. I overlapped the fabrics, stitched about 1/4" away from the upper edge with a straight stitch and then zigzagged over the edge before trimming away underneath.

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  2. You never fail to amaze me...I love it!

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    1. I've been playing with this technique for years and it's great for scraps. You'd be amazed how big a piece you'll end up with from what looked like a pile of garbage.

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  3. I love this technique as well and the proportions are perfect.

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  4. Replies
    1. Let me know what you think. It's fun.

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  5. Love, LOVE, LOVE the top - - and the painting from yesterday's post. You inspire me into action!!!
    Thank you so much!!
    Marian

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    1. OH... I'm so glad you're inspired. Have fun.

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  6. Love that, still got lots of jersey scraps in the basement!! Thanks for shareing

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    1. You're welcome. Have fun with the scraps.

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  7. Replies
    1. I hope you'll try it. It's fun to do with just one fabric or with a mix.

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  8. This is inspiring on so many levels--and the result seems to be perfect for you. It has just the right amount of interest to satisfy the eye, but not so much complexity that it would overwhelm the wearer. I love it!

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    1. I love the piecing and I think the complexity is perfect as you're saying - not overwhelming. See the 25th's posting for how I felt about the finished piece. Not so wonderful but it's the hemline not the piecing.

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Thanks for commenting. I appreciate the feedback and the creative conversation.