Wednesday, April 1, 2015

White Linen Reveal

There are a lot of things I wanted to talk about with making this white linen top only Helen's comment yesterday made me realize that holding off on the reveal would not be the nicest approach so I'm posting the the finished top today and will talk about those details later.





One concern starting the project was how to finish the neck and armhole edges. I avoid facings when possible and knew there wouldn't be enough fabric for bias strips plus - even if there had been - it's a heavy linen and the binding would have been too bulky for the look I wanted to create. Luckily, I had a much lighter, almost see-thru, white linen in stash and although the yardage didn't look like the same shade of white, narrow strips wrapped around the edge worked just fine and pressed crisp and neat.

I used the same method to apply the binding as I did with the black and white top earlier this month. In the comments, Alison had thanked me for the binding method and I'd replied that it was my first time trying it and we'd see how it held up in the wash. I haven't worn the black and white top but this one ended up with a mark on it and so has already been washed in the machine. The binding came through just fine. No fraying. No pulling out. All good.





Both the front and the back yoke were necessary because of the narrow - 22" - width of the remnant. I cut the lower front on fold and could have cut lower back that way too but I opted for a button closure to add interest. The buttonholes aren't cut. I stitched them and then overlapped the two sides and sewed the buttons through all the layers. I don't need the buttons to open to get in and out so a faux opening is just fine.





In yesterday's posting, I talked about planning my cutting path to maintain as large of scraps as possible. The section above was the narrow strip below the lower back piece from when I folded the fabric up right sides together. Opened and folded in the opposite direction, it was the only scrap big enough.





I completely finished piecing the back of the top before starting on the front so I'd know what scraps were available. The lower front was cut from the shape I showed in yesterday's posting and I drafted a yoke for the upper front and moved the dart into the seam line. I'll talk about how in another posting. The pile of scraps is all the fabric that was left. I used it to...





... stitch strips together for a piece wide enough for the front yoke. I started by cutting a 3" strip for the center and then mirrored the process of adding strips. Each strip was serged, pressed, and top stitched and whatever happened to the right side, happened to the left side. I cut out the yoke by centering the fold of the pattern piece with the middle of the center strip. You can see where the fold was pressed in.





Above is a detail picture of the front yoke after washing and hang drying the top. The linen is quite stiff but I know it's going to soften with age. This piece has the potential to become one of those favourite, worn to threads, kind of tops and one of the things I absolutely love about it is that it's made from "garbage" - fabric that wasn't big enough for something else and would have been thrown out. I'm so glad it was gifted to me instead.

Talk soon - Myrna

Grateful - sewing progress

Going to the junkyard is a sobering experience. There you see the ultimate destination of almost everything we desire. 
- Unknown

22 comments:

  1. Oh my! You have done well!!!
    You totally inspire me to do likewise!

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    1. OH... and please send me a picture. Have fun.

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    1. LOL - I didn't make you wait any longer. Thanks for the prompt.

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  3. Your top turned out very cute! Obviously a shortage of fabric is a great design challenge.

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    1. A shortage is one of my favourite starting points. It can be really stretching. There is still a little tiny bit of the white linen left that could become something. I'm going to piece it together when I have a moment.

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  4. So pretty Myrna, i can't wait to see it on you! And what a fabulous wardrobe workhorse. I love a light colored sleeveless linen top for summer heat, but i always want some extra structure, detail, or oomph to it or it's so blah and unfinished. The detailed front yoke, back yoke and buttoned placket on this piece are perfection. (avidly taking notes)

    haha, i know this type of 'creative process' all too well - usually i call it 'ekeing out' ;) I really like OOP B4985 for this purpose as the pattern pieces are so small to begin with. I've made it up of old tees and pajama pants, old linen curtains where i had to avoid areas of sun damage, and most recently a secondhand pair of white linen trousers.

    I enjoy working with a nice long length of fabric, but using bits and bobs certainly gives your brain a workout! And i get so many compliments on these type of garments, people love the extra details and interest - just like this gorgeous blouse.

    Thank you for the inspiration on getting my summer closet in decent shape! It needs WORK!

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    1. I had B4985 at one point and I think I passed it along a while ago... or it might be in the mix. I'll have to look but I do know I have one similar. Even if a pattern doesn't have little pieces, a big piece can be made up of smaller ones sewn together. Always fun that ekeing out. Happy working in your summer closet.

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  5. So GOOD!!! Love the simplicity and good design and you'll love this for layering and on hot days.

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    1. Thanks. I'm really pleased with its potential for mixing with a lot of looks. I have some summer pants it'll be cute with already.

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  6. That turned out beautifully. Thanks for sharing your process.

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  7. I love the way you created something fabulous out of what would have been nothing. In fact, I wouldn't have recognized this as a relative to the black & white top. With the front design details drawing the eye upward and the back design details cutting the width in half lengthwise, you've created the perfect garment for those of us who would like to camouflage or draw attention away from hips and thighs. I would buy that top in a heartbeat!

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    1. That's the fun of repeating patterns and taking them in new directions. I'm going to show something similar in the next two posts.

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  8. Love it. Especially the back with the buttons. Taking notes.

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  9. Simple lines; simply stunning concept and execution. I love love love a linen tank top for the summer; yours, especially with the back yoke and buttons, will be my inspiration! Thanks for promising to share how to rotate darts into the front yoke.

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    1. Thanks and you're welcome. I'm planning to write the dart info in an upcoming post, hopefully next week since I'll be busy on the weekend and need something to talk about BUT... if I forget... please prompt my memory.

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  10. I really like this! I'm a big fan of linen and I love the simple, clean design. Very elegant, IMHO.

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    1. Thank you. I think it'll be very useful as well and soften beautifully with age.

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Thanks for commenting. I appreciate the feedback and the creative conversation.