Tuesday, May 26, 2015

Near To Perfect

Yesterday didn't go quite as planned. I had a wonderful coaching session with Diane only she was just getting over a cold and by the end her voice needed rest so we postponed the jewelry class until Thursday.




She did show me some samples before I left and they provided a lot to think about while knitting on the porch at the B & B but before that I wandered around town looking for ideas and inspirations. I went to the hardware store which has a fabulous art section and bought some index cards to record processes that work for me and a sketchpad to record the inspirations I see. To take my work forward I need to be more alert to and diligent about recording ideas.




The pattern I'm knitting for the baby blanket is an alternating check. It has a rhythm that's easy to knit, more fun than garter stitch, and looks the same from both sides of the blanket. As long as I keep track of when to switch the pattern, I can keep right on thinking.




This lovely Asian woman didn't speak English but she knew exactly what I wanted when I pointed to my camera and her skirt. This is my favourite style sewn from very narrow panels of alternating fabrics. I thought about how one fabric could be left plain and surface designed and then the sections alternated for a more subtle change and a chance to play with paint.




On Sunday, I spent the afternoon with my friend, Ute,and she taught me how to make a welt pocket. She's a VERY good teacher. My first ever example turned out near to perfect. Today, I'm going back to sew the actual pockets into my raincoat. Nerve wracking! I can do this.

Talk soon - Myrna

Grateful - peaceful porches

3 comments:

  1. Nice pocket. There is also the applied welt pocket that is often found on coats and jackets. It's easier to do with heavier fabric I think. The key to that one is that the opening has to be a smaller on top than the bottom so that you don't see the pocket opening. None of these are hard with practice but I think that lots of people get scared having to cut into the the fabric.

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  2. Nice pocket. There is also the applied welt pocket that is often found on coats and jackets. It's easier to do with heavier fabric I think. The key to that one is that the opening has to be a smaller on top than the bottom so that you don't see the pocket opening. None of these are hard with practice but I think that lots of people get scared having to cut into the the fabric.

    ReplyDelete
  3. So happy for you to be enjoying a "creative" vacation - Love hearing all about it. Thanks for sharing with us - helps inspire me.
    Marian

    ReplyDelete

Thanks for commenting. I appreciate the feedback and the creative conversation.