Wednesday, March 16, 2016

Surface Designed Jeans

WHAT a lot of fun it's been to paint these jeans. I feel like I've made a significant stride forward on my goal. In fact, I've been excited all week about the potential of the three or more process. Every morning when I went into my closet and put on a garment sewn from an already fitted pattern, I saw the potential to take that one to the next steps too. There are t-shirts and blouses and jackets dancing in my dreams. YES YES.






I did make an eighth - and final - video. I'd love some more feedback on the videos if anyone has anything additional to offer. I think they got a bit redundant with pants in eight parts and I also think it was a great beginning to adding more videos to the blog. If you have any tips to offer or suggestions for topics, I'd love to hear them along with any other tips for the blog. I think it's time for a make-over and freshening up.





In the first video, I mentioned that I hadn't decided on the shape of the pockets yet. The pattern I used has angled pockets like view C above. I decided to make curved pockets like view B. The only difference is the shape of the opening. And the fit. The curve of B sits better over my hips than the angle of C. I'm too curvy for that line and the fabric ends up pushing out and trying to form a dart over my hip bone.





The tissue paper is the curved pocket pattern and the white tracing paper is the pocket lining of the angled pocket. At right, I've created a shape that blends the two.





I don't actually cut the front of the pants until I'm ready to attach the pocket. Above, I've pinned the pocket lining in place and below, I've cut away the unnecessary part. By using this method...





... I don't need a separate front piece for each pocket option. I can simply alter for the shape of my choice. I personally think it's really good to learn how to do these minor changes since it allows you to maximize the potential of a single pattern. I have seen people like many things about a pattern and then not buy it because of the shape of something as simple as the neckline when the shape could have been easily changed and the rest of the details maintained.





To fix the blotch, I placed a piece of tracing paper underneath and then used pins to prick the paper. When I held it up to the light, I could connect the pin pricks and draw the shape of the patch. Before adding the surface design that's shown in the video, I made sure I liked how the patch sat on top of the blotch and trimmed it where necessary.



 


In the video, I talk about possibly adding more paint underneath the patches to mimic the spread of the blotch. That ended up being the right answer. At left, the side seams are not sewn yet and at right, the pants are finished. I will get a picture of me wearing them but if today's post was actually going to get posted, this was as good as it was going to get.

The patch on the left hip isn't as visible from the front when I'm wearing the jeans as I wanted it to be and is very visible from the side. I may add a bit more paint to it down the line but for now, I'll wear them as is. I think the three patches all together create the balance I wanted.

In 2012, when I went to my first Design Outside the Lines retreat with Diane Ericson and Marcy Tilton, surface design was on the list of things I wanted to learn .. and again in 2013... and in 2014... and in 2015... and now... YES YES...  progress. This is good. I'm looking forward to trying another piece right after I try a pair of pants with added architectural details.

Talk soon - Myrna

Grateful - surface designed jeans

7 comments:

  1. This fabric design looks great. So original. I really look forward to reading your blog every Wednesday now that you've delved into surface design because I love the way you come up with original ideas. As for re-designing your blog, maybe you could use this fabulous design as part of your header. Keep it up!

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  2. Can't wait to see the pants on you. I've enjoyed watching your progress.
    I really like the videos -- you have a lovely voice, and I feel I "know" you better now that I've been listening to you.

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  3. Good save! Looks very purposeful.

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  4. Love the print you've created and the shapes to cover the "oops". The shapes look like continental plates so I'd call your jeans "Tectonic". The videos are very helpful – you have a lovely resonant voice. Just be sure to focus for long enough on each detail, not too much panning as it can be disorienting and give us the overall big picture too.
    Vancouver Barbara

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  5. The videos are a nice addition to the blog. Your creativity in designing fabric and then making adjustments to garments is growing quickly! Keep it up! Enjoy reading your blog and learning more tips.

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  6. This is so fun! I love these pants and the print, it has a lovely calligraphic feel to it. Anon's 'Tectonic' moniker is wonderfully evocative; to me the patches call to mind the paisley shapes which started you on your journey. Darkening up the edges of the pocket really ties everything together as well as calling attention to that detail/structure. To me i find those type of touches, tho they are mostly read almost subliminally, really make a huge difference in the total impact of a piece.

    I'm enjoying these videos as much as everyone else is :) I find the focus on process very helpful, and following the decision making tree as well.

    "I personally think it's really good to learn how to do these minor changes since it allows you to maximize the potential of a single pattern. I have seen people like many things about a pattern and then not buy it because of the shape of something as simple as the neckline when the shape could have been easily changed and the rest of the details maintained." More excellent advice! I cracked up seeing you used the 'pin poking technique', i do that all the time - pry about once every project. One of the simplest ways to copy a line, especially as when you're sewing pins and an ironing board (easy to poke thru) are right at hand!

    Anyways i use the pin poking quite a lot when i'm making the kind of small alterations to a pattern you talk about. Being able to draft a simple pocket/facing, collar, change a hem treatment gives a person tremendous freedom in working with patterns. Peggy Sagers of Silhouette Patterns has a lot of videos on this topic available on Youtube for free. They're a great resource for someone interested in starting to develop their skills in this area.

    Can't wait for the next post! :)

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  7. I love your blog and the videos. Please continue to share your thinking and creativity in both media.

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Thanks for commenting. I appreciate the feedback and the creative conversation.